Posters

Poster; Tourist tickets; Big Ben, by Hans Unger, 1972
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1972
Collection : Posters
Object location : Acton Depot
Reference number : 1983/4/7932
Size : H 1016mm, W 635mm
Print code : 273/1304M/4000
Publisher : London Transport : 1972
Printer : Johnson, Riddle & Company Ltd : 1972
Descriptive size : Double royal
Content text : Tourist Tickets One-Go-As-You-Please Tourist Ticket brings you unlimited *Travel on Bus and Tube *with certain minor exceptions (see leaflet) Tickets and Information from the Travel Enquiry Offices at Victoria, Oxford Circus, Piccadilly Circus, Euston, King's Cross and St. James's Park Underground Stations
Title : Tourist tickets; Big Ben
Colour : Yellow,Black
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Record completeness :
Record 84% complete

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By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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Relatively few London Transport posters are just about promoting more ticket sales on the system. Like any urban transport system, London's is often overloaded at peak times. Posters have always targeted travel outside the peaks with special offers on leisure journeys because the objective is to increase revenue but spread the load. The ideal is more passengers but at different times.
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From its first pictorial poster in 1908, the Underground and then London Transport have promoted sightseeing in the capital. Posters encouraged visitors and Londoners alike to either take a conducted tour or to explore the city themselves. Well known landmarks such as Nelson's Column and Buckingham Palace featured the most frequently, although lesser known places of interest were also publicised. Many posters focused on a specific sight, others simply encouraged visitors to 'See London by coach' or 'See London in summer'. Green line coach and country bus services allowed sightseeing to extend beyond the city.
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A historic city such as London has many important buildings and monuments. The iconic image of the Houses of Parliament or Nelson's Column often appeared in London Transport posters. Some encouraged travel to those specific landmarks, others were to promote conducted tours. Lesser known buildings and monuments in and around London were also publicised. As well as traditional buildings and monuments of historic significance, new architectural developments in London have also been celebrated in posters.
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Double royal : Double royal has been the standard poster size used by the Underground since 1908. This 40 x 25 inch format has been used almost exclusively by railway companies.
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