Posters

Poster; The Tate Gallery by Tube, by David Booth of the agency Fine White Line, 1987.
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1986
Collection : Posters
Object location : Covent Garden
Reference number : 1995/1823
Size : H 762mm, W 508mm
Reproduced in : London Transport Posters. A Century of Art and Design, edited by David Bownes and Oliver Green, Lund Humphries, 2008
Publisher : London Underground Ltd : 1986
Printer : Print Processes Ltd
Commissioner : Art on the Underground
Descriptive size : Double crown
Content text : The Tate Gallery by Tube One of a series of new paintings commissioned by London Underground
Additional information : This poster was commissioned in 1987 as part of the Art on The Underground series. The campaign was established the previous year as a conscious attempt to re-establish the London Transport poster tradition. Tate Gallery by Tube, by David Booth of the agency Fine White line, was the most popular of the series and reproductions continue to sell all over the world. Harry Beck's design for a diagrammatic Underground map, which is still used today, was first published in 1933. Booth's witty adaptation of the diagram presents the principal Underground lines in paint, presenting a clever play on the word 'tube'
Title : Tate Gallery by Tube
Colour : Light Green
Agency : Fine White Line
Printed by : Print Processes Ltd
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The range of entertainment on offer in London provided countless vibrant and enticing subjects for transport posters. Rather than advertising specific venues or events, posters usually promoted general activities such as shopping or going to the theatre. Many aimed to encourage travel to the city in the evenings and at weekends. Others encouraged regular commuters to stay in the city after work, rather than travelling home at rush hour. In the 1930s, posters were also issued with listings of specific events scheduled for that week.
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London Transport posters have promoted travel to almost all of the capital's many museums and galleries. Some advertised the institutions themselves, whilst others promoted special exhibitions. The exotic and eclectic collections offered the poster artist inexhaustible subject matter. Unlike other London attractions, museums and galleries could be represented by subjects and imagery not normally associated with the city, ranging from dinosaurs to ancient Egyptian sculpture.
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Double crown : Double crown is the descriptive size for posters that are 30 x 20 inches. This is slightly smaller than the standard double royal size, which is the most commonly used by the Underground. Double crown posters were originally displayed on the front panel of buses and the side panels of trams.
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