Posters

Poster; London memories; Wimbledon Common, by Emilio Camilio Leopoldo Tafani, 1918
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1918
Collection : Posters
Object location : Acton Depot
Reference number : 1983/4/714
Size : H 762mm, W 508mm
Reproduced in : London Transport Posters. A Century of Art and Design, edited by David Bownes and Oliver Green, Lund Humphries, 2008
Publisher : Underground Electric Railway Company Ltd : 1918
Printer : Avenue Press Ltd
Descriptive size : Double crown
Content text : London Memories Wimbledon Common With the Compliments of the Underground Rys.
Title : London memories; Wimbledon Common
Colour : Green,Brown
Printed by : Avenue Press Ltd
Record completeness :
Record 86% complete
Londoners are very fortunate in having a large number of green open spaces, where they can escape the hustle and bustle of city life. Many of these were the former grounds of large houses or royal parks, whilst others were specially created as London expanded. The River Thames also offers Londoners a variety of day trips. Further outdoor attractions include London's public sculpture and historic sites like Highgate Cemetery. All these open air destinations have been promoted by London Transport posters.
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Historically, London's heaths and commons were managed as an agricultural resource for the local population. Typically less formal than traditional city parks, these rural landscapes also provide a haven for wildlife. Trips to Wimbledon Common and Hampstead Heath were regularly promoted by London Transport. Until the early 19th century Hounslow Heath formed part of the Forest of Middlesex. It is now largely buried beneath the runways of London Airport, but early posters featured its historic associations with legendary highwayman.
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The Underground Group, and later London Transport, produced a wide variety of public information posters during the First (1914-18) and Second (1939-45) World Wars. The majority of wartime posters advised staff and passengers on emergency rules and regulations. Others were more overtly patriotic, often focussing on the valuable war work undertaken by transport employees. Some First World War Underground posters even urged onlookers to enlist with the armed forces. During the Second World War, posters were also used to explain tube 'etiquette' to the vast numbers of war workers and servicemen using the underground for the first time.
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First World War posters often carried a direct propaganda message. Before conscription was introduced (1916), the Underground published recruitment posters urging men to volunteer. Another series, depicting rural England, was commissioned to send to British troops overseas as a reminder of what they were fighting for. Back home, posters advised Londoners of wartime regulations and what to do in the event of an aerial attack. Some posters continued to advertise day trips, until fuel shortages put an end to non-essential travel.
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Double crown : Double crown is the descriptive size for posters that are 30 x 20 inches. This is slightly smaller than the standard double royal size, which is the most commonly used by the Underground. Double crown posters were originally displayed on the front panel of buses and the side panels of trams.
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