Posters

Poster; To Epping Forest; Dick Turpin, by John Bainbridge, 1956
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1956
Collection : Posters
Object location : Acton Depot
Reference number : 1983/4/6807
Size : H 1016mm, W 635mm
Print code : 256/194M/1500
Publisher : London Transport : 1956
Printer : Day and Wilkins Ltd : 1956
Descriptive size : Double royal
Content text : A highwayman found street congestion Made robbery out of the question With life one long hold up His assets were sold up And he was driven underground to the fresh air and quiet of Epping Forest - a fool's paradise, as his horse remarked! Central Line, of course, to Loughton or Theydon Bois
Title : To Epping Forest; Dick Turpin
Colour : Yellow,Brown,Green
Printed by : Day and Wilkins Ltd
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Record completeness :
Record 86% complete

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Leisure travel into the area now known as Greater London (and beyond) was promoted to increase revenue during off-peak periods. For similar commercial reasons, commuters were encouraged to live further out from the city in the new suburbs. Posters advertising days out by tube, bus or tram, were prominently displayed at station entrances and on the vehicles themselves. They include some of the most attractive and evocative posters produced by the Underground/London Transport.
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Day trips to the ancient forests bordering London remain a popular poster theme. Landscape artists, such as Walter Spradbery and Gregory Brown, set new standards in the depiction of trees and woodland scenes. Many of the posters feature Epping Forest, originally reached by motor bus until the extension of the Central line in the 1940s.
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Londoners are very fortunate in having a large number of green open spaces, where they can escape the hustle and bustle of city life. Many of these were the former grounds of large houses or royal parks, whilst others were specially created as London expanded. The River Thames also offers Londoners a variety of day trips. Further outdoor attractions include London's public sculpture and historic sites like Highgate Cemetery. All these open air destinations have been promoted by London Transport posters.
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There are over 5,000 acres of historic parkland in London. The Underground has always promoted parks as offering a peaceful retreat from the bustle of city life. Each park has its own unique history and character, an element of which is often the subject of promotional posters. Chestnut Time at Bushey Park, the deer at Richmond and horse shows in Hyde Park have all been the subject of posters promoting open air London.
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By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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Posters have rarely been about commuting, though they frequently encouraged people to move out to the suburbs where they would become regular commuters to central London. Almost as many posters have tried to get passengers to avoid the rush hour, though efforts to get Londoners to 'stagger the working day' have never had much impact. Not surprisingly, posters do not tend to promote the benefits of a commuting lifestyle, but try to mitigate its less appealing aspects.
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Double royal : Double royal has been the standard poster size used by the Underground since 1908. This 40 x 25 inch format has been used almost exclusively by railway companies.
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