Posters

Poster; For tram travel north to south, by Ralph and Mott, 1933
Simple name : Poster
Date : 1933
Collection : Posters
Object location : Covent Garden
Reference number : 1983/4/3678
Size : H 762mm, W 508mm
Print code : T2-3000-17.7.33
Reproduced in : Taylor, Sheila (ed), 2001. The Moving Metropolis. Laurence King Publishing in association with London's Transport Museum, p208
Publisher : London Transport : 1933
Printer : Waterlow & Sons Ltd
Descriptive size : Double crown
Content text : For Tram Travel North to South Kingsway Tramway Subway L.P.T.B. Tramways
Additional information : This poster, designed by Ralph and Mott, promotes the London Transport (L.T.) tramways and in particular the Kingsway tram subway for travelling to north and south London. The illustration includes the tramways logo incorporated in the London Transport roundel symbol to emphasise L.T.'s branding of different areas of the company's operations. In 1931, Kingsway subway was rebuilt to accommodate double-decker trams. The old G.-type single-deckers were replaced by the E3-class that had an all-metal body, which was safer to drive through the subway.
Title : For tram travel north to south
Colour : Red
Printed by : Waterlow & Sons Ltd
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Record completeness :
Record 85% complete
By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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Most London Transport posters illustrate the destination rather than the journey, for obvious reasons. Featuring the mode of transport, whether bus, train or tram, offers less imaginative scope to the artist and has less appeal to the majority of customers other than enthusiasts. With a few exceptions, the posters where road vehicles or railway rolling stock dominate tend to be more literal and lack artistic creativity. The best often make good use of humour and photographic images manipulated into surreal juxtaposition.
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By 1914 the Underground Group ran most of the Tube lines, three tram systems and the main London bus company, the LGOC. The posters publicise all these transport modes. Outside the Underground Group were the Metropolitan Railway and London County Council (LCC) Tramways, which ran separate poster campaigns. All these companies were merged into London Transport (LT) in 1933. The four main line railway companies also used posters to promote their London suburban services. Transport for London (TfL) replaced LT in 2000 with wider responsibility including taxis, streets, river services and some overground rail.
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Giving passengers useful information to help them on their journey has always been a major purpose of posters. The least successful are those that are difficult to read because they rely on too much text or have a confusing layout. To convey an important message quickly a poster should be concise and use a strong visual image but few words. Most London Transport posters are models of clarity but in the 1950s in particular the copywriter seemed to take precedence over the artist and the results often look as cluttered and wordy as Victorian posters with no illustrations had once done.
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Double crown : Double crown is the descriptive size for posters that are 30 x 20 inches. This is slightly smaller than the standard double royal size, which is the most commonly used by the Underground. Double crown posters were originally displayed on the front panel of buses and the side panels of trams.
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